Chambéry

Monument commémoratif

Commemorative monument bearing the following inscriptions. On the front: "Jean de Lattre de Tassigny, Marshall of France, 1889-1952." On the back of the back "Chambéry August 22, 1944: to the officers, non-commissioned officers, corporals and private soldiers of the First French Army - Rhine and Danube - that freed France from Provence to the Rhine 1944-1945. Do not submit."

When war was declared, Jean de Lattre de Tassigny took on the command of the 14th Infantry Division in January 1940. After the armistice, the French military was demobilized and disarmed. In order to rebuild confidence among youth during this climate of defeat,... Read more

Information

Coordinates

Address : A droite du Palais de Justice, à l'entrée du Parc Verney, Allée Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny , 73000 Chambéry
GPS Coordinates : 45.568896 , 5.918835
See on map
Themes and resources
Themes
  • Monument
  • Liberation
  • Liberation
  • Savoie
  • Armed Resistance
Complete description of site

Commemorative monument bearing the following inscriptions. On the front: "Jean de Lattre de Tassigny, Marshall of France, 1889-1952." On the back of the back "Chambéry August 22, 1944: to the officers, non-commissioned officers, corporals and private soldiers of the First French Army - Rhine and Danube - that freed France from Provence to the Rhine 1944-1945. Do not submit."

When war was declared, Jean de Lattre de Tassigny took on the command of the 14th Infantry Division in January 1940. After the armistice, the French military was demobilized and disarmed. In order to rebuild confidence among youth during this climate of defeat, he threw himself into the task of training army officers and reviving French troops with an eye to fighting alongside the Allies. His motto was "Do not Submit".

When the Germans took over the Free Zone on November 11, 1942, Jean de Lattre de Tassigny ordered his troops to resist. 0n January 9, 1943, he was sentenced to ten years in prison for abandonment of post, he escaped from Riom on the night of September 2-3 with help from his wife and son.

He took charge of and commanded the B group, the First French army of the Liberation, nicknamed Rhine-Danube for its victories.

Source: Les monuments aux morts et Chemins de Mémoire

Nearby Sites